WORKSHOPS

Submission and Acceptance


 

Please note that while Abstract Submission Guidelines apply, individual Workshop convenors may encourage or require authors to also submit a Short Paper. Any Short Paper submission will automatically be considered for the EASM Best Conference Paper Award 2019.

Workshops will be scheduled in parallel at an exclusive time during the conference, not overlapping with Parallel Sessions. In rare cases, the number of contributions per Workshop might need to be limited. In case of such an overflow of accepted submissions into a specific Workshop, the Scientific Committee will move some submissions into most suitable Parallel Sessions (usually, after discussion with Workshop convenors and respective authors themselves).

Also, shall a proposed Workshop not attract a sufficient number of accepted submissions, it will not be scheduled in the conference programme and accepted presentations will be moved into suitable Parallel Sessions.

 

Format


 

Please note that we encourage Workshop formats to differ from ‘standard’scientific sessions. Hence, convenors will contact presenters before the conference to inform them about the structure and flow of their Workshop in order to ensure a high-level Workshop experience for all participants.ment Education

 

Questions


 

For further clarification about topics and envisioned content of individual Workshops, please direct your questions torespective Workshop lead convenors in the first places.

 

Workshop 1: Knowledge translation in sport management


 

Rationale and Aim

Funding bodies seek to promote scientific research that has social or economic impact beyond academia, including in sport management. Sport management scholars frequently collaborate with industry and community stakeholders, and are thus well positioned to contribute to policy and practice in this field. However, with some notable exceptions, to date there appear to be relatively few deliberately designed pathways to research impact in sport management. Knowledge translation in sport management remains largely implicit and is yet to be fully understood. The policy ideal of ‘social or economic research impact’ is not always realized in practice and providing evidence on the complex relationship between knowledge and practice remains challenging for researchers.

By scrutinizing the knowledge translation practices of researchers operating in this field, this workshop will contribute to the theoretical and practical understanding of how knowledge translation can be designed and implemented in sport management. This workshop is designed for sport management researchers and seeks to cover aspects such as: The utility of knowledge translation for researchers;Existing practices in knowledge translation;Enablers and barriers to knowledge translation;Strategies to effectively communicate with different audiences (practitioners, policy-makers);The use of specific research approaches to bridge the research-practice divide (e.g., collaborative approaches to evaluation, action research);The creation of communities of practice where participants can share their experiences, challenges and successes with regard to knowledge translation.

The aim of this workshop is to draw together expertise in the field of knowledge translation, to showcase good practices, and to develop ideas and approaches to enhance sport management practice. This workshop can be a valuable step towards the development of approaches to bridge the research-practice divide in sport management and builds upon a successful knowledge translation seminar series hosted by Bournemouth University, Solent University and the Vrije Universiteit Brussel in 2018. This workshop should be of interest to all researchers in sport management who have an interest in broadening the applied impact of their research. There is also scope for the workshop to attract researchers from other academic disciplines where there is established momentum in knowledge translation. Such an interdisciplinary approach is useful to inform the sport management field and adopt good practice.

Envisioned Format and Flow

The following interactive formats are envisioned: Conveners’ introduction outlining the aims, scope and structure of the workshop; Invited petakucha presentations combined with interactive roundtable discussions where key issues (e.g., profile and role of boundary spanners) are discussed, and potential solutions put forward; Role play and analysis to demonstrate the various perspectives of key players in the knowledge transfer context; Conclusions and setting of agendas (possibly over a refreshment sponsored by Managing Sport and Leisure)
Submission Requirements

Abstract required, Short Paper encouraged.

Journal Special Issue

It is the intention that this workshop will lead to a special issue of the journal Managing Sport and Leisure. All workshop contributors will be offered the opportunity to submit to the special edition. Linked to special issue will also be a joint conversational piece written by the four workshop Conveners.

Convenors

Kevin Harris, Solent University, kevin.harris@solent.ac.uk
Andrew Adams (lead), Bournemouth University, aadams@bournemouth.ac.uk
Hebe Schaillée, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, hschaill@vub.be
Ramón Spaaij, Victoria University and University of Amsterdam, ramon.spaaij@vu.edu.au

 

Workshop 2: En route to the future of brand research in sport management


 

Rationale and Aim

The ESMQ Special Issue Workshop “Exploring new routes within brand research in sport management” during the European Sport Management Conference 2018 in Malmö generated a variety of inspiring presentations and lively discussions. Presentations covered a broad range of new routes in three panels: Social media conversations about sport brands and the fit of brand governance practices within non-profit sport organizations; The creation of shared value between sport mega event and sponsor brands and the co-creation of value of football brands through e-sport extensions; The role of athletes as brands discussing the new role of the athlete influencer as a human brand, measuring athlete brand equity and developing an athlete brand identity scale.

The workshop was not only a forum for the authors presenting and discussing their papers, it attracted many more conference participants. The successful 2018 workshop and the corresponding ESMQ 2020 Special Issue acknowledge the huge research potential on future aspects of brand research in sport management. However, the debate about future aspects of brand research in sport management is still in the beginning.

Therefore, this follow-up workshop, en route from Malmö to Seville and beyond, shall offer an exchange platform for innovative research topics in addition to and beyond the topics of the ESMQ 2020 Special Issue articles.

Submissions that discuss future aspects of brand research in sport management and focus on any of the following topics are particularly welcome, but are not necessarily limited to:

  • Globalization and sport brand management
  • Commercialization of sport brands
  • Digital sport branding
  • Psychological brand ownership
  • Sport brand co-creation
  • Brand experience
  • Strategic brand management
  • Brand alliances / sponsorships
  • Athlete brand management

Envisioned Format and Flow

The workshop shall provide a forum to develop new research questions and establish a continuing research debate. Therefore, workshop participants are asked to submit Short Paper in order to receive substantial comments on their submission. In addition, we want to encourage workshop participants to interact and discuss in a true workshop environment. To reach this, we aim to organize the workshop in two sessions: First, each workshop participant explains his/her research interest in the workshop topic and delivers a scientific presentation based on the five-page paper (10 minutes per participant). In the second session, the workshop conveners moderate a panel discussion in which all workshop participants are asked to comment on the presented research fields in order to identify future aspects of brand research in sport management. The conveners close the workshop with a wrap-up of the discussed topics.

Submission Requirements

Abstract required, Short Paper required.

Convenors

Tim Ströbel (lead), University of Bern, tim.stroebel@ispw.unibe.ch
Claas Christian Germelmann, University of Bayreuth, c.c.germelmann@uni-bayreuth.de

 

Workshop 3: Critical reflections on good governance in sport


 

Rationale and Aim

Good governance in sports organisations is becoming an increasingly important theme within sports management. It is on the research agenda because of various examples of governance failures in international sports governance, in matters relating to corruption, doping and match-fixing. A series of high-profile scandals have not only led to worldwide attention, but also to the increasing realization that these scandals are not incidents: they can occur in, and arise from, the system in which the sport organizes and manages itself.

Therefore, good governance is also relevant at national, regional and local level.
Academics are increasingly studying good governance in sport. Until now, the research has been mainly empirical and focused on the question: what is the state of good governance in sports organisations? Instruments such as the Sports Governance Observer (SGO) and the National Sports Governance Observer (NSGO) have been developed to measure and compare good governance in sports federations at international and national level.

The next step toward the development of a mature body of scholarly literature on good governance in sport consists of taking a more critical and reflective approach. For example, the way in which the findings from the SGO and NSGO research influence debates among politicians, practitioners and academics requires further consideration. Also, critical reflections on the theories and concepts that underpin instruments and methodologies are needed to increase the validity of the relevant indicators of good governance.

Critical and reflective research on good governance should also focus on the macro level, for instance, a question that requires further scholarly attention is ‘what does the (external) pressure and interference from governments and other stakeholders mean for the autonomy of sport organisations?’. At the meso level, a relevant question is ‘to what extent do changes in structure and procedures lead to actual (desired) changes in behavior and organisational cultures?’. At the micro level, questions such as ‘what do the requirements from good governance mean for sport managers, which competencies do they have to possess and to what extent do the requirements from good governance support or conflict with achieving the objectives of the organisation?’ are relevant.

While the workshop builds on the 2018 conference workshop on a related topic, we very much invite and aim to bring together researchers who are currently conducting research on good governance or are intending to focus on the questions above in the near future. We discuss papers and research plans with the aim of building a research agenda. Emphatically, experts across relevant areas such as governance, organisational change, organisational culture and politics are encouraged to submit and attend, as well as practioners.

Envisioned Format and Flow

The workshop will be built around a number of key questions, as outlined above yet also depending on authors’ submissions. Per question, short presentations will take place, in which the views and visions of the presenter is provided in a concise manner. After the presentations a panel debate will take place, including involvement of the audience. Based on this, conclusions will be drawn with regard to the research agenda and the content of the edited book.

The workshop’s ‘flow’ is intended to be lively in close interaction with the audience. We want sharp, to the point discussions. This means that the conveners will pay a lot of attention to the moderation of the workshop. They will contact the presenters before the conference, to ensure that they contribute to the aim and the flow of the workshop.

Submission Requirements

Abstract required, Short Paper encouraged.

Edited Book

All contributors will be invited to also contribute to an edited book with the provisional title ‘Critical Reflections on Good Governance in Sport’.

Convenors

Arnout Geeraert (lead), KU Leuven, arnout.geeraert@kuleuven.be
Frank van Eekeren, Utrecht University, f.j.a.vaneekeren@uu.nl

 

Workshop 4: Emergence and differentiation of global eSports


 

Rationale and Aim

Electronic sports (eSports) is the fastest-growing global form of engaging in and following sports. Revenues are estimated to be over $1,5 billion until 2021 (e.g., media rights, advertising, sponsorship, merchandise & tickets, game publisher fees). The ongoing discussion whether eSports is sport has recently gained new attention, particularly since the Olympic Movement has become interested in eSports as a growing phenomenon.

Reaching more than half a billion people worldwide, the field is creating a multi-layered ecosystem that may open up numerous opportunities for businesses, eSports organisations, traditional sports clubs, and also for public sector organisations. Considering it is still an emergent sector of the sport industry, many business logistics are still undeveloped and, in many respects, unstudied. It is expected, however, that eSports will have exponential growth in upcoming years and provide a variety of potential business and partnership opportunities in various contexts.

Addressing the ”knowing-and-doing” gap this workshop is looking for theoretical, conceptual and/or empirical contributions that may address one of the following or related topics:

  • Value co-creation in and through eSports
  • Utilising eSports in brand building and in communicating the corporate social responsibility
  • Creating eSports content and formats for media and broadcasting
  • Developing eSports experiences that meet the spectators’ cognitive and emotional needs
  • Improving the e-athletes and teams competitive performance and constructing an e-athlete identity
  • Establishing eSports institutions and support structures that improve stakeholders access to eSports ecosystem
  • Recognising common interfaces and building partnerships with traditional sports organisations
  • Developing the image of eSports and verifying its legitimacy
  • Generating eSports innovations based on digital technologies such as AI, VR and AR utilising artificial intelligence, artificial intelligence and virtual reality
  • Social issues, such as equality, gender and inclusion in eSports
  • Unwanted and/or unintended individual and societal consequences of eSports

Envisioned Format and Flow

The desired format depends on the amount of accepted papers. However, the desired format will be to have short presentations of papers followed by moderated discussions involving the presenters and the audience.

Submission Requirements

Abstract required, Short Paper encouraged.

Convenors

Harri Jalonen (lead), Turku University of Applied Sciences, harri.jalonen@turkuamk.fi
Bettina Reuter, Kaiserslautern University of Applied Sciences, bettina.reuter@fh-kl-de
Osmo Laitila, Jyväskylä University of Applied Sciences, osmo.laitila@jamk.fi
Tara Q. Mahoney, SUNY Cortland, tara.mahoney@cortland.edu

 

Workshop 5: Managing accessibility and inclusion of sport


 

Rationale and Aim

The EU White Paper on Sport (2007) states that “all residents should have access to sport. The specific needs and situation of underrepresented groups need to be addressed, and the special role that sport can play for young people, people with disabilities and people from less privileged backgrounds must be taken into account”.

Since the publication of the White Paper increasing media attention has been focused on the rights of people with disabilities in accessing and feeling included in sport. People with disabilities are regarded as the world´s largest minority group by the World Health Organization/World Bank. Over one billion people (about 15% of the world´s population) experience marginalisation in employment, income, health, and in our focus, sporting engagement (participation, spectatorship, and employment). This represents a significant challenge for policy makers, academics, managers and other stakeholders involved in sport. Moreover, the number of people with disabilities is rising and will continue to increase in the coming five decades; those involved in the management of sport need to think strategically to ensure the inclusivity of sporting activity.

In many countries, the existing solutions to address inclusivity are focused on promoting legislation, policies and programmes to facilitate equality of access and encourage participation in sport. Nevertheless, academic research has demonstrated that the inclusion and participation of disabled people in sport environments at all levels remains a challenge.

Some remark that research on disability sport in the sport management domain is nascent and to date, most extant research is focused upon active sport participation with more recent analysis extending the traditional demographics to focused on the aged. While active participation is important, there are wider conceptualisations of engagement that also involve the need to think about spectatorship and employment. It has been recognised that these areas have been neglected. For example, EU funding programmes for sport ignore the various social benefits that can arise through sport spectatorship or employment in sport.

To bridge this gap, what is needed is more research that takes a wider perspective on the management of accessibility and inclusivity in sport and looks beyond simply participation. What is also needed, given that this is an under-researched area, is the engagement of sport management practitioners to ensure that academic research is relevant and can have practical impact. For this reason, this workshop seeks to bring together academics, industry practitioners, and institutions from Europe, the US, Australia and other countries to deliver on the following three aims:

  • To allow academic researchers and industry practitioners a forum to present their latest accessibility research;
  • To foster discussion between academics, practitioners and institutions on the state of accessibility in sport management in order to drive new pathways for research and action;
  • To provide sufficient indicators and best practices that contribute gradually to break the resistance from upper level managers to the effective implementation of inclusive and accessible sporting environments.

Envisioned Format and Flow

One session of workshop will involve a series of academic presentations charting the state of the current literature base, led by the conveners but open to invitations from other academics. This will be followed by academic-industry partnership presentations, charting the practitioner perspectives.

The second session will involve a panel-discussion of industry practitioners and academics on the recent issues (possibly, those involved in the English Human Rights Commission investigation into the services offered by Premier League football clubs to their disabled fans). This could conclude with pathways to further research, scholarship and academic-practitioner links.

Possibly, an end of day activity will be organised, such as a guided tour of Spanish LaLiga First division club, Real Betis Balompie, located in Sevilla and led by the Disability Liaison Officer of the club. This guided tour will see how accessibility is operationalized and hear about the programmes led by the club in relation to inclusion of their supporters.

Submission Requirements

Abstract required, Short Paper encouraged.

Journal Special Issue

This workshop shall be a starting point to discuss and design a journal special issue proposal. Participants will be encouraged to help driving this project.

Convenors

Paul Kitchin (lead), Ulster University, pj.kitchin@ulster.ac.uk
Juan Luis Paramio-Salcines, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, juanluis.paramio@uam.es
Geoff Walters, University of London, g.walters@bbk.ac.uk

 

Workshop 6: Designing sport management curricula


 

Rationale and Aim

The aim of this workshop is to further a shared background and to exchange avenues for developing sport management study programs in Europe and beyond, including a focus onnational characteristics.

For example, the project ‘New Age of Sport Management Education in Europe’ addresses the issue of improving relevance of sport management education in nine countries (Denmark, Finland, Czech Republic, Norway, Germany, France, Spain, Greece, Lithuania).Generally, the workshop should inform and encourage participants to improve the match between obtained skills through sports education and demand in the labor market. A better match between sport education institutions and enterprises employing graduates of sport management studies should be a clear objective.

The aims of the above-mentioned project – a follow-up on the ‘Aligning a European Higher Education Structure in Sport Science’ project – are a starting point to frame the workshop and read as following:

  • To develop and adapt a labor market driven curriculum that is designed to improve the match between sport education institutions and demand in labor market.
  • To include the sport business professionals in the development process.
  • To adapt innovative practices such as combination of “Sport Business Intelligence” & “Performance-Importance Matrix (PIM)” and the use best practices in curriculum development processes.
  • To increase awareness amongst the sport management education providers and universities to establish a new agenda in the future.

Envisioned Format and Flow

An innovative and participant-focused workshop design will be developed and discussed with presenters of accepted contributions. Reporting on existing data and comments from practitioners or EU decision-makers may add to presentations based on accepted abstracts/papers.

Submission Requirements

Abstract required, Short Paper encouraged.

Convenors

Jens Peter Sørensen (lead), University College Nordjylland, jpso@ucn.dk
Kari Puronaho, Haaga-Helia University of Applies Sciences, kari.puronaho@haaga-helia.fi

 

Workshop 7: Global development of ice hockey business


 

Rationale and Aim

Ice hockey is traditionally famous sport in Scandinavian countries, North America, Russia and in some Middle and Eastern European countries. However, there are multiple new countries interested in developing their ice hockey leagues, and establishing new businesses within the ice hockey business. Recently, The International Ice Hockey Federation (IIHF) has opened a new office in China, which is heavily investing in winter sports.

As a continuation to the workshop in Malmö 2018 (“Progress of Ice Hockey in in light of Economic and Political Influences”,www.easm2018.com/conference/workshops) this ice hockey management workshop will have a wider focus, discussing the benefits and shortcomings of various (global) sport models in modern ice hockey, and their mutual influences and challenges.The rational of the workshop in 2018 was to discuss the NHL/KHL influences (such as migration, cultural legacy and the Americanization/eventification of ice hockey) and led to a special issue in Sport in Society (in production).

Generally, we expect to receive submissions and participants that have a focus on hockey, business and sport models/logics. Topics for this workshop could be (but are not limited to) the following:

  • The benefits and shortcomings of franchises or autonomous sport clubs
  • Closed or open systems (leagues)
  • Continental or national leagues
  • Different business models in Ice Hockey
  • Government sport policy in Ice Hockey development
  • Ice Hockey development programmes

Envisioned Format and Flow

The desired format depends on the amount of accepted papers. However, the desired format will be to have short presentations of papers followed by moderated discussions involving the presenters and audience. The aim would be to engage participants into an active discussion and provide the opportunity to get involved in the EU-project proposal.

Submission Requirements

Abstract required, Short Paper encouraged.

Possible Joint EU Project

Participants have, besides their presentations, ideas and interests, the possibility to be a part in the imminent EU Project-application in 2020. The project will particularly focus on different sports models, borders and migration, test sport logics and values in sport. The test and analysis will also be connected to business and finance issues related to profit maximization and utility maximization.

Convenors

Jyri Backman, Malmö University, jyri.backman@mau.se
Bo Carlsson, Linnaeus University, bo.u.carlsson@lnu.se
Aila Ahonen, JAMK University of Applied Sciences, aila.ahonen@jamk.fi
PG Fahlström, Linnaeus University, pergoran.fahlstrom@lnu.se

 

Workshop 8: Towards more robust designs for researching the impact of elite sport on society


 

Rationale and Aim

In the early twenty-first century, elite sport increasingly became a policy priority. When facing the challenge of justifying investments in elite sport to their public, elite sport policymakers tend to argue that a wide range of societal outcomes will ‘trickle down’. However, there is scarce evidence to support this dominant discourse. Indeed, the current empirical evidence base regarding a range of claimed impacts generated in the context of elite sport is inadequate and fragmented. When measuring impacts assumed to be triggered variously by elite athletes, sporting success, or the organisation of major sporting events, it seems that academics have traditionally used study designs where causality is difficult to establish. A further criticism of elite sport impact research is the strong use of case studies and expert opinion with the subjective perceptions of individuals playing a key role as the main source of evidence.

This workshop resonates with calls for the research community to contribute to empirical research with robust and appropriate research designs rather than offering assertions or opinions. Intrinsically, elite sport is neither beneficial nor harmful. If we believe that elite sport can and should enable particular impacts, then we need to ask how elite sport should be envisioned and implemented to enable and, ideally, optimise its assumed impacts.

Overall, the quality of evidence for the impact of elite sport in relation to several outcome areas is relatively weak. What is required to develop the field is mixed-method designs based on theories of change, which are more appropriate for establishing causality. Indeed, sport management scholars have called for the need of more holistic research frameworks and the adoption of mixed methods approaches.

The purpose of this workshop is to bring together researchers to develop the field of measuring the societal impact of elite sport further. Theoretical, empirical, and methodological submissions in light of the problematic evidence base and resulting limited understanding of the role of elite sport in society are welcomed. We suggest that pushing forward with (inter- and transdisciplinary) mixed-method research designs informed by recognised conceptual frameworks such as programme theory or theory of change principles will assist in providing a more solid evidence-base to guide the decision-making of practitioners and policymakers.

Overall, the workshop on aims to:

  • Review the current state of knowledge regarding the use of mixed-method and logic model designs in the field
  • Propose a future research agenda for robust measurement of the assumed societal impacts of elite sport
  • Facilitate a unique networking opportunity between scholars and students with an interest in the field of measuring societal impacts of elite sport

Envisioned Format and Flow

After the 10min presentation. Each researcher will have 3 minutes and maximum of 5 slides to present a ‘burning question’ or ‘big idea’ for the audience. The idea is to set the platform for discussion and collaboration throughout the workshop.
The workshop will be organized followed by a debate, with prepared key questions and issues within the timeframe. The workshop will end with a concluding discussion (including conveners, presenters and members of the audience) on the state of the art of research and the development of a future research agenda.
The conveners consider inviting guest speakers from sport industry or governmental agencies in order to provide opportunities to blend research and practice.
Presenters will be asked to stay within the workshop for the entire duration of the workshop (depending on the number of abstracts submitted, max. 2 sessions – about 160 minutes overall).

Submission Requirements

Abstract required, Short Paper strongly encouraged.

Journal Special Issue

Depending on interest in this workshop and, especially, the substance of submissions/presentations/discussions, the conveners consider submitting a journal special issue proposal and, particularly, would encourage workshop contributors to submit their work.

Convenors

Veerle De Bosscher (lead), Vrije Universiteit Brussel, veerle.de.bosscher@vub.be
Simon Shibli, Sheffield Hallam University, s.shibli@shu.ac.uk
Maarten Van Bottenburg, Universiteit Utrecht, m.vanbottenburg@uu.nl
Jens De Rycke, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, jens.de.rycke@vub.be

 

Workshop 9: Special Workshop Malmö 2018: Sport and integration from a policy and governance perspective


 

Rationale and Aim

At the 2018 EASM European Sport Management Conference, Malmö became the first EASM Legacy Charter City. The charter was founded as a statement of co-operation between the city of Malmö and Malmö University in endeavours for social aims and “the role that sport and sport management can play in meeting the challenges of a modern city”, such as a growing population, migration and multi-culturalism.

This Special Workshop Malmö 2018 builds on the legacy of the 2018 conference; the Malmö Charter;and the workshop “Bern 2017 and Malmö 2018 Special Theme Workshop: Social Integration in and through Organised Sport” and the thematic symposium “Rethinking Sport for All: Inclusion and Integration (?)”, both held during the 2018 conference.

This workshop focuses on sport, integration and social development in the light of city planning, governance and policy implementation, the production of innovative sport project in the city as well as in sport clubs/organisations and, not least in innovative organisational hybride settings. How can integration and inclusion in and through sport be promoted in modern cities? Policies for using sport as an arena for integration are common, but are the policies being efficiently implemented? How is integration interpreted in different policies and projects? What is the role of academics, of professionals and of sport management? How could new organisational settings and co-operations increase the goal fulfilments and achievements? What practical and theoretical insights can be drawn from projects and initiavites?

The conceptual frame of the workshop includes sport management perspectives regarding governance, policy implementation, social entrepreneurship, CSR and planning. Also, the presentations should discuss critical aspects of sport as a tool for integration, for instance based on perspectives regarding social integration and/or system integration, bridging and/or bonding, and integration into and/or through sport.

The workshop will include a report of the current situation and ongoing projects in the city of Malmö, as promised in connection to signing the Malmö Charter. Notwithstanding this departure, the main focus will be dealing with novel and challenging presentations, submitted to this workshop, from cities all over the world.

Due to the subject, the aim and the content of the workshop we expect to receive contributions from academic as well as professional abstracts and participants. This is the basic rational of the workshop. We are encouraging academic and professionals/practitioners from the same projects/cities/nations to problematize the same issues from different angles. For instance, professionals at the Skåne District Sport Federation, representing the Swedish Sport Movement, and The Department of Sports, Recreation and Leisure in Malmö, representing a public authority, will contribute together with the responsible rearchers with insights into policies, projects, new ways of co-operting and challanges. We will encourage professionals from all sectors to contribute: public sector, commercial sector, voluntary sector etc.

Envisioned Format and Flow

The desired format depends on the amount of accepted abstracts. However, the desired format will be to have short presentations of papers, with an appointed discussant to each paper, followed, at the end of the workshop, by moderated discussions involving the presenters, and the representation from the academia and sport/city authorities.

Submission Requirements

Abstract required, Short Paper encouraged.

Journal Special Issue

In addition to the present workshop we will be working to submit a proposal for a journal special issue, and another workshop at the European Sport Management Conference London 2020.

Convenors

Karin Book (lead), Malmö University, karin.book@mau.se
Johan R. Norberg, Malmö University, johan.norberg@mau.se
Patrik Karlsson, Skåne District Sport Federation, patrik.karlsson@skaneidrotten.se
Malin Eggertz Forsmark, City of Malmö, malin.eggertzforsmark@malmo.se

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